World leading technologist Dr Genevieve Bell to join ANU

Friday 27 January 2017

The Australian National University (ANU) has appointed one of the world’s leading technologists, Dr Genevieve Bell, as a Professor in the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science.

Dr Bell joins ANU in February from global innovation company Intel as part of the University’s commitment to drive innovation in Australia.

Dr Bell has served as a Vice President of Intel where she became the first woman in the company's history to be appointed an Intel Senior Fellow.

“As a little kid, I remember thinking the ANU was the most remarkable place. It was full of big thinkers, and great story-tellers and such a lot of history,” Dr Bell said.

“That I get to return to it as an adult and a member of the faculty is a genuine privilege. I am also excited to be afforded the opportunity to collaborate with CSIRO’s Data61.”

Dean of the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science, Professor Elanor Huntington said she was thrilled to appoint Dr Bell to the College.

“I’m thrilled that Genevieve has chosen to join us,” Professor Huntington said.

“She is a distinguished technologist and public intellectual, and a leading figure in diversity and inclusion globally in the technology sector.

“Her potential to transform the relationship between people and technology cannot be understated, and I look forward to her achieving great things from her new base here. It’s been a pleasure to build on our long-standing partnership with CSIRO Data61 and join forces to make this a reality.”

Acting ANU Vice-Chancellor Professor Margaret Harding said Professor Bell was an exciting appointment.

“The enduring mission of ANU is to develop new capability on behalf of the nation, and the fields of computing and engineering are central to delivering on that mission,” Professor Harding said.

CSIRO’s Data61 CEO Adrian Turner said it was wonderful to have Dr Bell return to Canberra.

“Genevieve has been tasked by ANU with exploring how to bring together data science, design thinking and ethnography to drive new approaches in engineering; and in partnership with Data61, exploring the questions of what it means to be human in a data-driven economy and world,” Mr Turner said.

After completing a PhD in cultural anthropology at Stanford University, Dr Bell joined Intel in 1998.

At Intel, she led the company’s first user experience research and development lab. She is recognised as a world leader in the ethnographic approach to developing technology.

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